80. Baby in A Tent

The hospital staff had been very attentive monitoring his condition and doing whatever they could do.  I kept vigil by my son’s side late into the night, eventually slumped over in a bedside chair.  

At some point after midnight the night doctor entered the room.  He looked over his little patient -who was nearly one year at this time- and then told me he felt Alok was out of immediate danger.

He advised me to go home and sleep awhile.  I was rather hesitant but at last I gave in.  We lived so close and that was something of a comfort.

I slept hard, the phone didn’t ring (we saw that as a good sign) and after a light breakfast Diana and I headed to Alok.  Before we stepped into his room we were at the nurse’s station to let them know we arrived.

The on-duty nurse said he looks real well considering all he went through …she then told us that during the night he took a turn for the worse!

What??  What is the reason they didn’t call us?  She said because it all happened so quickly and just as fast they brought him back out of it, they were getting to the call.  “…oh but he’s doing so much better now!”  We were beside ourselves with shock and saying no more went straight away to the room.

No sooner we walked in when Alok saw us through the tent.  He then leapt up and with his little arms extended and fingers wiggling frantically he repeatedly said in his baby words, “My daddy, I want my daddy!”  and this daddy knew exactly what he was saying!

Well not only did that squeeze my heart bringing tears of joy to both his parents’ eyes, it was reassuring to see all that energy -especially after what we were told about earlier that morning.  Seeing him looking so well we all but forgot about the missing phone call.

It was advised Alok stay in the hospital one more night for observation.  We embraced him through the tent; I wanted to squeeze him so tight.

Not understanding his surroundings he repeatedly cried, “Go home!”  For such a little guy he tried desperately to get out of the protective tent.  

Diana and I stayed with him most of the day.  We played with him and read to him and watched him sleep.  Alok’s condition was rapidly improving and I’m sure it had much to do with his parents’ presence.  

That evening we went home after constantly assuring him that he’d go home with us in the morning.  Admittedly it was very difficult to leave him and we had to wait till he was napping again.  

|||


 

 

 

79. Heart Wrenching Fever

I’m feeling the need to recap slightly.  

Seven and a half years have now passed since I left my island home of Fiji to settle in America.  I’m feeling desperate to see my family.  I needn’t reiterate the hefty price tag attached to this desire of mine.  

A seed planted in my brain way back in my youthful Fiji days came to mind.  There was a friend of mine who had told me, “If you want to see the world, work on a ship!”  He worked on the SS Mariposa and if you can recall I did actually take his advice.  More to the current situation I previously stated the possibility of my working on a Merchant Marines ship going in that direction.  

This would make the visit a reality and at the same time I’d earn money for the support of my children as my family is my first and foremost dedication.  I’m seeing it as a win, win!  C - theatre dtlaSusan and Lisa right next door made it extra comforting.  Then Diana wouldn’t feel lonely and she’d have help with the children; the family is there for one another.  So let’s pick up from there.  

During this time, I asked around to people who may have worked or are currently working on passenger/cargo ships.  

I was advised to take a trip up to San Francisco where the Seafarers’ Union was located.  They would help me land a job on a ship a lot easier than if I tried without the Union in the Los Angeles area.  That was the word at the docks.

Again Diana and I had a serious discussion to reiterate my determination and what all would be involved.  The plan was made to go up north and clearly I would be taking this trip on my own.  I would move around faster and get straight to the points, not to mention financially, it would be easier.

As fate chose to have its way, a couple of days prior to my leaving for San Francisco both of our sons somehow became very ill and with rising fevers.  

We took them to the family doctor who after looking them over and in all his current wisdom made his diagnosis,  “… so keep them cool and be sure they take in as much clear fluids as possible.  Constantly check their temperature and if it doesn’t break bring them immediately to the emergency room!”  It was pneumonia and he wrote a prescription.

We returned home with the boys and their prescribed medication.  I prepared a large bowl with ice cubes and cold water, putting in some face towels.  We placed the cold towels on their foreheads and patted down their little bodies in hopes of relieving their fevers.  

For whatever reasons, this wasn’t working; Diana and I didn’t hesitate for a moment in getting them to the emergency room at Saint John’s Hospital.

Straight away they took in both of the boys.  Amar our eldest, was placed into a bath of ice cold water in hopes of reducing the fever swiftly.  They had taken the younger Alok into a different room.

The emergency room staff’s efforts with Amar worked and soon after, his fever broke.  They would release him after a couple of observation hours.  Diana and I were to say the least, relieved in that good news.  In the same moments we were being informed of their efforts with Alok in that, they were not so successful.

Of course we knew it was absolutely necessary to keep Alok in the hospital overnight at the very least, he simply must win this battle with the unrelenting fever which reduced itself only ever so slightly.  

We quickly talked it over and Diana took Amar home while I stayed in the room with Alok.  His tented bed was oxygenated and at the same time would keep out any nasty germs.  I promised my wife I’d call before bedtime and update her of his progress.  

I was so completely distressed to see my little baby boy lying there, knowing that I was helpless to do anything more but pray.  In light of my traumatic heart ache a few years back, I admit, I was scared.

|||